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Second Language Acquisition (SLA) as a Promoting Factor in Language Change

  • In long-standing language contact situations, SLA mechanisms can account for changes in LI. While it is obvious that LI influence on L2 can be accounted for as a transfer effect, I postulate that SLA effects are responsible for certain aspects of L2 influence on LI as well. This is transparent if early stages of SLA are compared to early stages of language contact: what is affected most in both cases is the lexicon. Examples are drawn from Pennsylvania German, a German-based language spoken in the USA and in contact with American English (AE) for c. 300 years. The data imply that the conceptual matrix of the Speakers’ minds has shifted from German to AE, resulting in constructions that can be traced to AE, while the conscious language choice is still German. This conceptual shift relates to a stage in SLA, when the learner begins to get a grasp of the internal systematicity of the L2 and reduces the transfer of structural LI material to L2, i.e. the beginning of a structuralization process in the learner’s interlanguage. The quality and sequence of the “invading” material in language contact is strikingly similar to the sequence of the material composed in the process of SLA, implying a close relationship between the two processes.

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Metadaten
Author:Doris Stolberg
URN:urn:nbn:de:bsz:mh39-34187
Parent Title (German):Working Papers in Linguistics. Proceedings of Generative Approaches to Second Language Acquisition (GASLA) IV
Publisher:University of Pittsburgh
Place of publication:Pittsburgh
Editor:Alan Juffs, Tim W. Talpas, Greg Mizera, Brian Burtt
Document Type:Conference Proceeding
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2000
Date of Publication (online):2015/01/23
Creating Corporation:University of Pittsburgh
GND Keyword:Pennsylvaniadeutsch; Sprachkontakt; Sprachwechsel
First Page:201
Last Page:212
Dewey Decimal Classification:400 Sprache / 430 Deutsch
Linguistics-Classification:Bilingualismus / Mehrsprachigkeit
Open Access?:Ja
Licence (German):Es gilt das UrhG